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Wafer Level Chip Scale Package (WLCSP) Removal and Installation

Wafer Level Chip Scale Package (WLCSP) Removal and Installation

Demonstration of a Wafer Level Chip Scale Package (WLCSP) being removed and installed on a printed circuit board using an AT-GDP Placement and Rework Station. WLCSP measures 1.5mm x 1.5mm with a 0.4mm pitch.

4-Ball BGA 0.8mm x 0.8mm - Placement and Soldering

4-Ball BGA 0.8mm x 0.8mm - Placement and Soldering

Rework of a 4 - ball Wafer Level Chip Scale Package (WLCSP) measuring 0.8mm x 0.8mm from a 7mm x 6mm PCB. The 4 solder balls that are 0.26mm in diameter with 0.4mm pitch. The removal / installation process was performed using the AT-GDP Placement & Rework Station.

QFN / MLF Rework

QFN / MLF Rework

Demonstrates removal and installation of a Dual Row QFN / MLF component (9mm x 9mm, 0.5mm pitch, 116 leads) on a mobile phone board using an ATCO model AT-GDP Placement & Rework Station. In-process component placement capability allows rework without the need for site cleaning.

Micro BGA / CSP Rework

Micro BGA / CSP Rework

Demonstrates removal and installation of a Micro BGA component (3.5mm x 3.7mm, 0.4mm pitch) on a mobile phone board using an ATCO model AT-GDP Placement & Rework Station. Features include split vision optics, software process control, and lead free reflow capable.

Reflow Soldering with Video Recording and Observation module

Reflow Soldering with Video Recording and Observation module

Upgraded video observation module for PRO 1600 Reflow Oven now allows taking still images and recording video during a reflow cycle. Camera may be focused and magnified at the solder paste joint level thereby providing visual feedback during the soldering process. Primary benefit of this feature is analysis and study of behavior of solder paste and SMT components during reflow soldering. It helps to identify, analyze, and ultimately to prevent defects. The module includes a dual panel 16” X 16” high temperature rated glass cover, high resolution camera with optical and digital zoom, lighting system, multi-angle adjustable camera mounting, and an advanced Imaging Capture software. Click here for additional information

Fine Pitch Connector Rework

Fine Pitch Connector Rework

Demonstrates installation of an 80 pin Fine Pitch Connector (3.6mm x 16.5mm, 0.4mm pitch) on a mobile phone board using an ATCO model AT-GDP Placement & Rework Station. Features include split vision optics, software process control, and lead free reflow capable.

Fine Pitch QFP 208 Rework

Fine Pitch QFP 208 Rework

Demonstrates desoldering, solder paste printing, and installation of a fine pitch QFP 208 (30.6mm x 30.6mm) component using an ATCO model AT-GDP Placement & Rework Station.

Monitor view during optical alignment of QFP 208 (30.6mm x 30.6mm).

CSP / µBGA Rework

CSP / µBGA Rework

Introduction

Also referred to as micro BGA’s, Chip Scale Packages (CSP) although similar to traditional BGA components differ in overall size and diameter of solder spheres. Their size is typically smaller and solder spheres are about ½ the diameter of BGA’s which range from 0.55mm to 0.75mm. This article details rework of a CSP on a test board using an AT-GDP Rework Station. A Lead Free profile has been applied during removal and installation processes.

Components

The CSP measures 7mm x 6mm and contains 46 spheres (Figure 1). Solder spheres measure 0.35mm in diameter with a pitch of 0.75mm. Test board measures 70mm x 165mm.

Removal

After securing the test board by the board holder’s clamps, an operator installs a vacuum pick up tip and nozzle suitable for the CSP device. Implementing machine’s optics, the nozzle is aligned over the component. A pre-established profile is selected from the software’ library and Start icon is selected. At this point the process is hands-off. Rework station automatically drives the nozzle down to a board and covers the CSP. Machine then activates vacuum pick up tip so as to remove the component once reflow is achieved and the heating cycle is initiated. Figure 2 shows a nozzle covering the device during reflow. Heating is precisely controlled by the software (Figure 3). It mimics an original profile with heat applied from both top and bottom sides of a board. Source of bottom heating is Quartz IR while the top side is forced air or nitrogen convection. As is shown in the video of removal, upon completion of reflow, the machine lifts a CSP off a board and moves nozzle up along Z axis to its starting point. Figure 2: Nozzle covering CSP during reflow Figure 3: Screenshot of a profile Residual solder remains on the board after removing a component. It takes the shape of Hershey’s kisses candy due to surface tension of molten solder (Figure 4). As a result of its uneven shape and volume, solder must be removed prior to installing a new component. This is commonly performed using a solder wick method... see more in attached pdf file

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BGA Removal and Installation

BGA Removal and Installation

Introduction
Unlike surface mount components with leads around the perimeter (i.e. QFP), Ball Grid Array (BGA) packages contain a matrix of solder spheres on the bottom side. From a design standpoint, one of the benefits that a BGA offers versus a QFP is having greater number of I/O connections over the same amount of real estate. The disadvantage however, is that those I/O connections are now hidden making rework a more complicated process requiring specialized equipment. This article details the steps of reworking a BGA device on a motherboard using an AT-GDP Rework Station. A Lead Free profile has been applied during removal and installation processes.
Components
BGA measures 31mm x 31mm (1.22” x 1.22”) and contains 421 spheres (Figure 1). Solder spheres measure 0.6mm in diameter with a pitch of 1.0mm. Motherboard measures 229mm x 305mm x 1.52mm thick (9“ x 12” x 0.060”).

Figure 1: BGA on a motherboard

Removal

After securing the motherboard by the board holder’s clamps, an operator installs a vacuum pick up tip and nozzle suitable for the BGA device. Implementing machine’s optics, the nozzle is aligned over the component. A pre-established profile is selected from the software’ library and Start icon is selected. At this point the process is hands-off. Rework station automatically drives the nozzle down to a board and covers the BGA. Machine then activates vacuum pick up tip so as to remove the component once reflow is achieved and the heating cycle is initiated. Figure 2 shows a nozzle covering the device during reflow.

Heating is precisely controlled by the software (Figure 3).   It mimics an original profile with heat applied from both top and bottom sides of a board. Source of bottom heating is Quartz IR while the top side is forced air or nitrogen convection. As is shown in the video of removal, upon completion of reflow, the machine lifts a BGA off a board and moves nozzle up along Z axis to its starting point.


Figure 2: Nozzle covering BGA during reflow

Figure 3: Screenshot of a profile


Residual solder remains on the board after removing a component. It takes the shape of Hershey’s kisses candy due to surface tension of molten solder. As a result of its uneven shape and volume, solder must be removed prior to installing a new component (Figure 4). This may be accomplished by using a vacuum de-soldering tool or more commonly by wicking solder with a copper braid and soldering iron. 

Figure 4: Pads after cleaning off excess solder

Installation 

Once pads on a board have been cleaned to remove residual solder, the component may be installed.  After the BGA has been picked up by the rework station, the next step involves transferring flux or solder paste to spheres of a device. Both may be applied by dipping the component in a universal plate. Implementing tacky rework flux however, is more common. As displayed in Figure 5, the BGA is dipped into a Flux Transfer Plate (Part: FTP-ATGDP) that contains a pool of tacky flux 300µm deep. Now the tip of each of the 421 solder spheres contains a small amount of flux that is necessary for proper reflow and joint formation.       


Figure 5: BGA dipped in flux

Component is now ready to be optically aligned over the matching pads on a motherboard. As the Split Vision Optics arm is moved into position (Figure 8). It enables viewing solder spheres of a BGA and pads of a board simultaneously on the same screen. Magnification and LED lighting intensity may be adjusted to create optimum solder sphere size and contrast between the two images.   Figure 6 shows a camera view screenshot where solder spheres and pads are misaligned. By adjusting the X-Y micrometers of a vacuum lockable board holder and theta rotation adjustment, BGA’s spheres were aligned over board’s pads (Figure 7). Component is now ready to be placed and soldered.




Figure 6: Solder spheres and pads misaligned

Figure 7: Solder spheres and pads aligned



Figure 8: Split Vision Optics arm in position



Upon moving the optics arm to its original position, the device may now be placed on a board and reflowed. As in the removal process, the same pre-established profile is selected from the software’s library and a Start icon is selected. Sequence in an Install mode instructs the rework station to automatically places the BGA on a board, lifts up the vacuum tip away from component’s surface, and begin heating. Figure 9 shows a nozzle covering the BGA during reflow. Heating is precisely controlled by the software (Figure 3).   It mimics an original profile with heat applied from both top and bottom sides of a board. Uniform stream of cool air or nitrogen is directed through the nozzle to form strong, high quality joints. As is shown in the video of installation, upon completion of a cooling stage, machine moves the nozzle up along Z axis to its starting point. Installation process is now completed (Figure 10).



Figure 9: BGA being soldered

Figure 10: BGA installed on a motherboard


Conclusion

In order to properly rework a BGA component, the rework station must contain features like split vision optics, software controlled sequencing and thermal management, and automation. These features not only simplify the process but also enable achieving high quality results on a consistent basis. 

Flip Chip Installation

Flip Chip Installation

Introduction

An increase in implementation of Flip Chips, Dies, and other micro SMD devices with hidden joints within PCB and IC assembly sectors requires capability to precisely install and rework such devices. This article details the installation process of a Flip Chip onto a BGA IC substrate using an AT-GDP Rework Station. A Eutectic Soldering process is being applied.

Components

The Flip Chip measures 8.25mm x 6mm while the BGA substrate is 35mm x 35mm (Figure 1). Flip Chip contains 560 solder bumps with each bump measuring 65μm in diameter and the pitch is as fine as 180 μm. Figure 2 shows an actual image of a Flip Chip captured on the AT-GDP Rework Station’s camera view screen. Figure 3 displays the corresponding pads on a BGA substrate.

Thermal Stress - Convection Reflow Assembly Simulation per IPC-TM-650 Test Method 2.6.27

Thermal Stress - Convection Reflow Assembly Simulation per IPC-TM-650 Test Method 2.6.27

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the reflow process of thermal stress reflow simulation on bare PCB’s per IPC-TM-650 Test Method 2.6.27 (Thermal Stress, Convection Reflow Assembly Simulation). This standard requires PCBs or test coupons to be reflowed six (6) times and then evaluated for quality compliance. Each of the six reflow cycles must be nearly identical to one another in order to maintain the profile tolerances specified in the standard. By automating the six cycles within a reflow oven, consistency is attainable, chance of operator errors that may invalidate the test are eliminated, and efficiency greatly improved.

Automating Reflow of Surface Mount Devices per IPC / JEDEC J-STD-020 for Classification and Preconditioning

Automating Reflow of Surface Mount Devices per IPC / JEDEC J-STD-020 for Classification and Preconditioning

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the reflow soldering process on Surface Mount Devices (SMD) per IPC / JEDEC J-STD-020D.1. SMD suppliers subject their products to this test for classification and preconditioning (JESD22-A113F) purposes. This standard requires SMDs to be reflowed three (3) times and then evaluated for quality compliance. Each of the three reflow cycles must be nearly identical to one another in order to maintain the profile tolerances specified in the standard. By automating the three cycles within a reflow oven, consistency is attainable, chance of operator errors that may invalidate the test are eliminated, and efficiency greatly improved.

Solder Paste Printing Directly to LGA (Land Grid Array) and MLF / QFN (Quad Flat No-Leads) Packages

Solder Paste Printing Directly to LGA (Land Grid Array) and MLF / QFN (Quad Flat No-Leads) Packages

Unlike Ball Grid Arrays (BGA), Land Grid Array (LGA) and Quad Flat No-Leads (QFN) packages are supplied with bare plated contact pads and solder must be used in the assembly or rework process to install such components. There are several methods of how solder may be applied such as paste printed on the PCB, pre-tinned on the package, or applied directly to the package prior to reflow. The benefit of applying solder paste directly to the package versus pre-tinning is that it reduces processing time, eliminates unnecessary handling, and does not subject a part to an additional thermal cycle. This guide outlines step by step procedure of solder paste being transferred directly to an LGA device prior to being optically aligned and soldered using the AT-GDP SMD/BGA Rework Station.

BGA / SMT Rework

Installation process of a BGA component using the AT-GDP BGA / SMT Placement & Rework Station.

Profile view of BGA's solder spheres during reflow.

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